The “Eastern Indigo” snake or as most of us in Texas know it, the “Blue Indigo” is North Americas largest non-venomous snake. These snakes can grow up to 9 feet and eat the toughest rattlesnakes for breakfast.

Blue Indigo Snake

















  • Bowski

    I wouldn\'t mind having a few of those around my place. I hate rattlesnakes!

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  • skater babe

    OMG thats amazin i want to have one

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  • l.perez

    i believe i have one live in town ; daughter seen it all i saw was tail end it seemed to have white stripe

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  • Crystal

    We have a bunch of them here where we live in Fla. Had one come out from under the porch yesterday about 5 ft. Had a 8 ft one a few yrs back don\'t know if he\'s still around or not. just killed a black snake with orange belly don\'t know what kind it was.

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  • Brianna

    OMG that was amazing. I think that would be a awsome pet because I hate rattle snakes & personaly i\'m scared of them.

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  • Jesse

    Yeah, I\'m from South Texas and the Blue Indigos are very common. They\'re completley harmless. They won\'t bother you if you don\'t bother them. They have no venom but if they are provoked they will chase you and won\'t stop. They are extremely quick and have a strong grip. I wouldn\'t recommend anyone to provoke this snake. They\'re tough. But they\'re good :D

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  • Ricky Lozano

    Do they have fangs? I caught a 7 footer this past weekend in South Texas.IT was real gentle to handle not aggressive at all. I released it unharmed.

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  • MP

    I got home this evening and saw my 3 black labs interested in something. I saw a flash of black and figured they had a baby skunk. The the object decided to do a nice furl for effect and I realized they had an Indigo. The snake got outside the chain link fence and just lay there, I figured they killed it. 10 minutes later I went out to toss it in the burn pit and it was gone, but Fat Albert was sniffing something under the fig tree. There it was, just laying there, still looking dead,.....but I thought it was dead outside the fence before. So,.....I picked it up and took it to a nice opening under the house (pier & beam) and the snake just slithered right in like nothing ever happened. So I\'m thankfull that we have an Indigo protecting us against rattlesnakes and completely wowed by the fact that he fooled 3 dogs and me.
    BTW, the last place we lived, just south of Alice, TX, there was an Indigo a full 13 feet long living in a neighbors yard; I saw it several times completely crossing the 12 foot ranch road!!

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  • ward

    MP

    Sorry but they do not get that big!!!!!!!!

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  • Guest

    Snake at the ranch

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  • Blake B.

    In Brackettville, Tx. this last weekend I was following a blood trail in search for a deer taken from the morning hunt. As I was focused on the trail, I heard some rustling leaves to my right. About 5, MAYBE 6 feet away I saw about 2.5 ft. of the tail of a black snake slithering into a hole beneath the roots of an old oak tree. Just that portion of the snake was so large I couldnt completely grab the snake with one hand (if I wanted to). I would have to use 2 hands for my fingers to touch in other words. Not being a native, I had no idea what I was looking at and nearly coughed my heart up. Later on a discussed it with some locals and they informed me it was this Blue Indigo. An extremely amazing, and impressive snake.

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  • RUBEN

    I saw one around the house about 7ft long after looking at the pictures I have a much greater respect for this beautiful animal.

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  • DMS

    Snakes to be Loosed in San Leon
    The Blue Indigo snake was introduced to Texas by the King
    Ranch. They were imported to kill rattlesnakes. While they do eat
    small rattlers, the King Ranch found out that they love to eat cats.
    San Leon has initiated a

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  • DMS

    Snakes to be Loosed in San Leon
    The Blue Indigo snake was introduced to Texas by the King
    Ranch. They were imported to kill rattlesnakes. While they do eat
    small rattlers, the King Ranch found out that they love to eat cats.
    San Leon has initiated a

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  • Nolan

    DMS

    The \"King Ranch\" import myth is strong in South Texas. These are a native species. They have always been in Texas, long before any white man.

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  • becca

    love this snake. Iam from South Texas , my dad brought one home to me from the hunting lease. I was able to talk my science teacher into letting me keep it at school for some show and tell.
    Sam was the talk of the school. The snake loved to be handled!! We fed him small feeder rats and were able to watch him shed a few times,,, absolutly beautiful. My Brother is a Texas Wildlife biologest and informed me that i had to turn it loose. So we did and at the ranch he was turned out at , he was seen on several occasions at the ranch house just a big and beautiful as always.. Great pet!!

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  • jasmine

    What do baby blue indigo snakes eat?

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  • Vell

    Indigo\'s are extremely agressive but are so important to our ecosystem. I\'m not a big rattlesnake fan so Indigo\'s are the good guys!

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  • Edward

    lol snakes are ugly and scary i just hate them ................. :((

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  • eli

    i was in south texas,on my vacation with a friend,we were having a cook out,when something cought my eye,two huge blue snakes twirled together making a twist,they were both standing up on there tips of there tails,it looked like the medical sign,found on patches,i never seen anything like that!i was amazed!my brother told me,they eat deadly rattle snakes,so we let them be.

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  • Ron

    A couple of years ago a 7 foot Indigo snake attacked a 5 foot bull snake right in front of my kitchen window. Unlike the above rattlesnake, the bull snake is a constrictor and, at one point, had 3 tight wraps around the Indigo\'s neck. No matter. The Indigo methodically crunched his head [a lot of blood], killed the bull snake; pulled him straight and swallowed him.

    The \'fight\' lasted 3 hours and I got plenty of photos. I live right on the Rio Grande, south of Eagle Pass, Texas.

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  • anthony mccray

    My Sister used to live in Del Rio, Texas while She, my newphew, niece, and my Brother-In-Law was stationed in the Air force.

    I recall stories where on occassion the kids would find a large very intimidating very large snake which they would not go near.

    At the time I was actually breeding this snakes cousin\'s the Central American D. Corais Melanuras and the Mexican D. Corais Rubidus species in Southern California.

    Now that my Daughter is getting older I\'m interested in returning to my hobby with photographing and breeding this protected species. Can anyone share the best locations to observe and photograph the Texas Indigo Drymarchon Corais Erebenus (Blue Bullsnake).

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  • anthony mccray

    Can anyone share the best locations to observe and photograph this beautiful snake.

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  • JT.

    I live in beeville, Texass and just witnessed my first indigo very immpressive snake wasn\'t sure if it was venomous or not it was in our back yard the kids were freaking out. Animal control came and took it away.

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  • spoonieduck

    JT.

    JT,

    Although they look a lot like the ultrvenemous black mamba of Africa, the Indigo snake is non-venemous and, especially because it eats rattlesnakes, needs to be protected and encouraged. I wouldn\'t try to pick one up, though. They have strong jaws and, as I have personally seen, kill their snake victim by crushing its skull by chomping on it.

    Interestingly, they are not constrictors but can kill and eat constrictors [like bull snakes] almost as big as they are.

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  • adrian

    i caught a blue indgo snake in my closet it was fun i got bite a few times but it did not hurt and i am only 11

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  • Alondra Gtz.

    I thinkk i may have a blue indigo in my backyard!! But I am not sure its long and black n hisses!!!

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  • spoonieduck

    Where do you live? Blue Indigo snakes are usually long--most 6-8 ft--and shiny black. They are not slender snakes and the older ones are thick-bodied. The head is blunt or rounded and not much wider than the body.

    An old cottonmouth is usually shorter than 4 ft, and is dull black or olive. It is thick-bodied with a short tail. The head a little wider than the body and is triangular. A helpful identification trait is, on the sides of the head, is a dark line that seems to go right through the eye.

    Blue Indigo snakes are \'good\' snakes that will happily eat cottonmouths.

    Ron

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  • Chrystal

    My dad saw the tail end of a black snake in his house crawling back through a hole. Yes he lives in the country in a very old house. They live in West Texas about an hour and a half south of Lubbock. Never seen this kind of snake there before so didn\'t know what it was. Could it be a blue indigo snake or what? They have a ton of rattlesnakes so if it is one that would be great!!!

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  • Mary

    Do they have fangs? I was bit by something in my yard while I was walking in the tall grass. The puncture holes are still there this morning. The pain from the bite hurt for several hours. I was just wondering what snake could leave two fang holes but not be venemous.

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  • SpoonieDuck

    Where do you live, Mary? A snake bite that leaves two puncture marks is generally from a venomous snake. Sometimes, however, a venomous snake doesn\'t squirt venom into the wound--this is known as a \'dry\' bite. These kinds of bites usually aren\'t very painful.

    Most bites, in which significant venom is injected, by rattlers, cottonmouths and copperheads are very painful. It sounds like your wound is more aggravating than anything else. On the other hand, if you think that you might have been bitten by a venomous snake, you need to go to the emergency room and have it looked at. I had a friend bitten on the foot by a cottonmouth. It didn\'t bother him much but he finally decided to go to the ER. They kept in the hospital for a week because he got pretty sick.

    Even should a snake not inject venom, a tetanus shot is a good idea. Call your ER or your doctor to make absolutely sure that you are OK.

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  • Marian Beddingfield

    I had one of these in my livingroom! When I walked over to check my e-mails for the nite, I saw it crawl under the computer cabinet! I\'m sure it came in thru\' the fireplace looking for mice that I had seen come in. I opened all the outside doors & banged my broom around all the furniture. Needless to say, I left all the lites on that nite!

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  • eb

    saw a very large one crossing the road/runway at the cameron county airport near laguna vista, texas. largest snake i have ever seen in the wild. looked to be 6\' to 8\' long and was bigger around than a good forearm. that was one large snake.

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  • Sarah

    I was told that the Blue Indigo Snake had testicles, is this true???

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  • Sarah

    Does the Blue Indigo Snake have testicles showing or inside of their bodies?

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  • Ron

    Sarah

    All male snakes, indigo snakes included, have internal testes.

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  • Carolyn

    I saw my first Blue Indigo snake today in Mission. It was huge, the biggest snake that I have ever seen in the wild. I felt honored that this snake was protecting the property from rats and rattlers. He must have been an older snake because he was really big in length and width.

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  • Ron

    Carolyn,

    With the possible exception of the Eastern Diamondback Rattler [the largest of which was measured at 8.5 feet] the Blue Indigo Snake is the largest snake in North America outside of Mexico.

    I have seen them close to 8 feet in length and suspect that the exceptional one may go to 9 feet or longer. They are all exceptionally heavy bodied and powerful. They are not constrictors and kill by chomping the heads of snake prey with their powerful mandibles. In my experience they are usually relatively close to water and I\'ve even seen them swimming in a canal. On the other hand, I\'ve seen them in my yard which is .25 miles from any canal or pond.

    Probably their affinity for water is due to the availability of prey. My canal has plenty of water snakes that Blue Indigo snakes probably enjoy.

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  • Mel

    I was coming out of my garage and must have walked right passsed him because I didn\'t notice him until I was backing out. He was about 5ft long and thick. He was a very quick moving snake. I\'m terrified of snakes so this guy really scared me considering that he\'s probably the biggest I\'ve ever seen outside of the zoo. Now that I\'ve read all these posts, I feel a little better about have him around as I have two little ones that love to play outside. We do have a deep drainage ditch behind our home. My question is, will they come after you or just try to get away? This guy sort of came after my truck at first but then headed back towards the drainage ditch.

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  • Chuck Higbee

    I grew up in East Texas between Lufkin and Nacodoches. As a youngster my best friend and I loved catching snakes of all kinds. In my teens while driving a country road home from my Grandparents house one night, I saw what looked like a black snake cross the road. Reaching from the grass on one side to the other side of the road as it whipped off into the pine trees. I could not believe what I had seen. Now, after all these years, I know what snake it must have been. Had to be at least 12 feet long.

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  • Mac Junebug

    hell yea i want one for real its just like a pit i love snakes especially this one

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  • Hadley H.

    I don\'t know where the facts come from, but 9\' is nothing compared to the one i saw. Kid you not, the biggest snake i\'ve ever seen at least 20\' at least, and thats a reserved estimate cause i would say closer to 30\' and as thick as a basketball, because it was bigger than any snake i have ever seen on t.v. If you don\'t believe this, then just be warned when camping along the Devil\'s River.

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  • Glenda

    Could it be a Texas Indigo Snake?? I couldn\'t find anything in my book but did see this on the internet.

    Let me know if this is what you saw. They are the longest snakes in North America! Yikes!!!

    Sue

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  • Bud Lang

    We call him Hank. I discovered him a couple of years ago while tearing down an old barn on my property near Lake Ray Hubbard, a Dallas Reservoir. It seems Hank was about as curious of me as I of him so we spent the day together. Hank would try to stay in the shade among the rubble of the renovated barn but would slither to the edge of a board and discover that there was a long drop to the ground that he would choose not to experience. I arranged boards so he would have another option, and I found that I was enjoying arranging the boards and watching the animal make his way around the rubble. At lunch time, I walked the 60 to 70 yards home but stopped to take care of a small tree arbor where I take care of 50-plus seedlings. A friend came by and prompted me that there was a snake in the fence behind me and that I should walk toward him. I did but turned to see that it was the Texas Indigo that I had befriended. I introduced the two and told my friend that Hank and I had spent the morning together and had some long conversations. After lunch, my friend went back with me to the barn. As we were walking at about halfway back, he stopped me and pointed Hank out to me in the grass as he followed me back toward the old barn. This is the third year that Hank has stayed around and has grown to about five feet long. He spent the day with me yesterday May 27, 2011. I located a cottonmouth nearby where I was working, identified it by its distinctive odor, but avoided the thing, attempting to keep it at a distance. I am disappointed that I didn\'t witness the event but the odor went away and Hank became a lot larger. Hank climbed atop a woodpile and absorbed the warm Texas shade for about six hours while the birds went bonkers and I did my work on the landscape. I really think Hank feels right at home with us. I hope so.

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  • Kathy McCown

    And I mean waaaaaay longer than 8\', like at least 14-18 feet long, and really really thick!

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  • Kathy McCown

    In the early 80s we had a blue indigo racer come into the yard where we lived along the Coleto Creek near Victoria. It was much longer than 8\' and extremely thick. It was the scariest snake I had ever seen, and they ususlly don\'t bother me, having grown up North of San Antonio, with snakes all over the place, especially copperheads.

    Now I live in Alaska where we do not have snakes at all. Have to have barn cats to get rid of the mice/shrews/voles.

    My daughter\'s place is over run with rattlers. She lives on 50 acres in Orange Grove, Texas. She has them everywhere, especially with the drought now. Can she get any of the indigos for her place? Just wondering....
    Kathy

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  • Carolyn R

    Nolan, I am with you on this. I grew up in Alice, Tx. & the King Ranch myth is legend but from all I have read the snakes are native to S. Tx. They are fascinating.

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  • Jamie

    The eastern indigo snake ranges from southern South Carolina south through Florida and west to Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.[1] A related species, the Texas indigo snake (Drymarchon melanurus erebennus), is found in southern Texas and Mexico. And they only get to around 9 feet.

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  • GENE

    Can you tell me where I may purchase a Texas Indigo ? Thanks.

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  • Sherry

    Just bought a small ranch close to stockdale texas a Lot of rattlesnakes. When we had a large ranch in crystal city my ex had several blue indigos but I have no idea where he got them. Can they be bought to help control rattlesnakes

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  • Itasca

    Do they bite humans and if not would the blue indigo snake be a gud pet

    from Texas, USA
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  • Patrick

    I saw a what I believe to be a blue indigo yesterday on farm rd 2644 near El Indio. The snake was in excess of 12 ft. and had a pearlescent underbelly. An incredibly beautiful creature that was intimidating even seen from the cab of a pick-up. Now I read that they eat rattle snakes...my vote for most amazing snake ever.

    from Mission, TX, USA
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  • Larry

    Do they have a taste for copperheads? I also have 25# Jack Russell that finds and hates snakes. Any problems there?

    from Guadalupe County, TX, USA
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